Where Is Your New Job Going To Come From? Social Networking For Contract Attorneys.

It’s no secret – or at least a terribly-kept one – that today’s job market is incredibly tough. The promises of yesteryear that, once you become a qualified lawyer, the world of newly-qualified associate roles will spread itself out in front of you, have gone. No More. Ceased to be. Like a departed parrot. Sorry, that’s enough Monty Python.

Not only has the state of the legal job market declined in terms of associate positions on offer, but the level of competition for those roles – which was already plenty high enough years ago – has continued to increase year on year, thanks to more and more training providers enticing and encouraging more and more students into their hallowed (or not so hallowed?) halls.

Add to this uncomfortable job market the fact that the legal employment landscape itself has changed and life becomes more and more uncertain for those unfortunates who are still looking for that big break. So, how has the legal employment landscape changed over the past few years?

Contract Attorney Central only recently picked up a copy of Laurence Simons’ Global Legal Salary Survey & Market Trend Report. A leading international legal recruiter, Laurence Simons‘ research should provide us with some enormously useful information. So Contract Attorney Central poured over their research into some of the current trends in finding a new role.

  • When asked how they found their current position, nearly a third of all respondents said that it was through a recruitment agency, showing that this remains the most popular and effective method.
  • Broadly the same number of respondents found their current role either through their professional network or other personal contact.
  • Oddly, in this digital age, only 1% found their current role through social media, however, 50% of respondents still consider social media outlets such as LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook as being important when seeking a new role.
  • When asked how long it took to find their current position, 83% said they found theirs within 6 months, with 35% taking less than 1 month to secure a new role.
  • 92% of all respondents had found their current position within a year of first looking.

These figures seem to paint a very rosy picture of the legal job market, which is at odds with our experience at Contract Attorney Central, both personally and anecdotally.

Here at Contract Attorney Central, we agree with some of the findings, insofar that our first port of call when looking for a new role is always the recruiters. However, always keep in mind that your co-contract attorneys will have their ears to the ground too, so they will also be a gold mine of information. So long as they’re willing to share it, that is! Stay close, stay connected and you should be able to find your next role soon.

So how about you, Contract Attorney Central readers? What do you think is the most important and effective method of finding a new role? How long did it take you to find your current position and what is that position – is it contract attorney work or an associate/other legal role? As for employers, where do you concentrate your new employment efforts?

CONTRACT ATTORNEY CENTRAL – QUICK TIP:

Check out contract attorney and document review related LinkedIn groups and connect with fellow contract attorneys.  Contract Attorney Central does recommend that you join some LinkedIn groups and get engaged in discussions: Contract Attorney Networking Group, Document Review and e-discovery Multi Lingual Project Attorneys are great places to start.

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9 thoughts on “Where Is Your New Job Going To Come From? Social Networking For Contract Attorneys.

  1. LinkedIn is my preferred network tool besides the classic recruitment agencies path.

    As you point out there are loads of groups where relevant information are shared and agencies also post jobs.

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  2. I’ve read that competition for attorney positions has gotten fierce, as is true for other entry-level professional positions as well. I wonder how those of us who do social media, even if not connected specifically to the field of law, can help make the connection between potential candidates and a new position.

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  3. Friends made on reviews are a great resource. I keep in touch with a bunch of them and we keep alerting each other, try to get each other on projects we are on, give each other valuable information as to where projects stand or working conditions. Linked has also been helpful but thus far I have never landed a job through it but I have managed to get 2 (perhaps 3 – one is currently short listed for a later start) friends onto projects and got a 3rd an interview. Actually most of us CAse are a super friendly bunch. Have met fantastic people on these reviews, generous, helpful, intelligent, interesting,super funny and very knowledgeable. Most are more than ready to help others and share their experience. We do watch out for each other. I guess that in itself is a bit of an oddity in the legal field. So yes by all means network. And only if you need to hear that ir is not you but that the market is tough for everyone.

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  4. How right you are about the difficult employment environment. It is a challenge no matter what the profession. I have found that my personal network along with LinkedIn were my best bet when looking for a new opportunity. Sigh, these days there are really no good places to find a good position.

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  5. Leora, the point made by Andrea is an excellent way of connecting. Let’s take your domain of websites for small business as an example: I’m sure you are networking like crazy all the time; be that through friends old and new, and also ‘professional’ networking. Just keeping the lines of communication open between all of these connections about new developments in the world of WordPress, for example, will enable better information sharing which will, ultimately, lead to a better understanding by all. The same is true, naturally, of filling empty job positions. Granted, that we typically speak about on this site in the area of contract attorneys are temporary jobs, and so there may be a certain element of wanting to keep information about new jobs to yourself, but to the extent that this is not the case, networking with friends and colleagues is proving to be a great way of finding a new role.
    What do you find is the best way to create new opportunities or to create new flows of traffic to your site?
    Thanks! Contract Attorney Central

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  6. Well, we’re pleased to say that, thanks to a lot of networking throughout the web and in real life, Contract Attorney Central has now connected with over 500 people on LinkedIn. Our aim is to connect with more and more people, whilst using our connections to ensure that Contract Attorney Central becomes an ever-increasingly useful and mutually beneficial hub for contract attorneys and other legal professionals all over the world. We already have connections all over the world and are happy to facilitate further connections between our connections who don’t yet know each other. Contract attorneys are such a hugely useful resource to the legal community, so let’s keep helping each other! Come and say hi on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/trevor-fulano/48/501/355
    Thanks and continued good fortune to all!
    Contract Attorney Central

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